Wednesday, September 11, 2013

Islamic Responses to Media

In week 4 we will consider how Islamic communities have responded to the use of various forms of media, paying specific attention to the ways media can be used to present religious beliefs and rituals and the debates surrounding religious media practices. The reading by Walter Armburst on “The Riddle of Ramadan: Media, Consumer Culture and the ‘Christmasization’ of a Muslim Holiday” looks at media use during Muslim festivals and debates about how religious media messages may impact perceptions of religion. The article by Jon Anderson on “The Internet and Islam’s New Interpreters “will help us reflect on how the presentation of Islam online may challenge traditional religious structures and authority roles. Come prepared to discuss how media may both help and challenge religious communities’ communication and behavioral practices.

13 comments:

Claire Levatino said...

I thought it was interesting that the Muslim culture is heavily concerned with the responsibility of internet users. They seem to be very aware that islam is under the scrutiny of the media and are trying to be proactive in changing the media's perspective.

Paige Dusthimer said...

Perceptions of Ramadan practices as a whole have changed, therefore changing and affecting local habits. This happens through their consumerism through the media. What is reflected world wide, they take to a personal level. Mere entertainment such as this riddle have actually impacted the children's ideas about Islam.

Tamsyn Morison said...

In Walter Armburst’s article I found it interesting how TV not only lets it viewers know when it’s time for prayer, but it stops its broadcasting and plays music during the allotted prayer time. I find this interesting because religion is not brought up during TV in most Western cultures. In Jon Anderson’s article i realized that with out the internet many practices that the muslins participate in today wouldn’t look the same. It’s interesting how the internet allows them to pass on traditions, allowing their religion to grow and blossom.

Lynna Jezek said...

In Amburst's article I was really surprised to find that Ramadan suffers from commercialization just as Christmas does. Perhaps it doesn't suffer from being commercialized quite as much as Christmas, but I was shocked to discover that it isn't just the Christian holidays that are threatened by corporations and making profit.
The other article surprised me as well; I had no idea that such pressure was put on Muslim people to keep a good reputation in regards to the media.

Rachel Ann said...

In Anderson's article it is asserting the middle class of Islam who are taking control of the web and connecting not only with Islam, but with others around the world. It's good for Islam that people are able to see every side and not just what the media wants to portray. With the web they can reach a lot of people at the click of a button; normal people, who live normal lives of Islam can relay their stories, beliefs, political views, and lives to people everywhere.

Cal Smith said...
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Cal Smith said...

In Anderson's article I found it fascinating how many sub cultures of muslims seem to exist on the internet. From different class groups, regions, and sects of the religion unite online for various motives. I wonder how this interaction with the World Wide Web actually plays a role in their day to day worship and lives.

Daniel Humada said...

I found it interesting how the muslims have used the internet and media to change the perception about themselves and to help themselves pray. im curious as to how the advancement in technology will further help change their culture.

Jordan Brooks said...

I like how acceptable their religion is throughout their social media. Why is our culture opposed to involving religion in normal television programming the way Islam is in eastern countries?

Zachary Lix said...
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Zachary Lix said...

I have to agree that our society is much less accepting of religion, I like how the media promotes religion in a nonchalant way. Although it is also possible the media could use their power in a negative way. Anderson and Armburst both give a view that many of the western ideals are being adapted to fit in with islam. The idea that the internet, TV and radio as a whole (all native to the west) have such an impact on islamic culture.

Karlie Willbern said...

In the Islamic tradition of Ramadan i feel like there are two sides of it when it comes to the media. On one side you have the religious promoters who actually use the media to promote the holiday and its traditions and values. On the other side you have companies, such as food chains, who like to use the holiday to advertise their products, almost as if they are taking advantage of the holiday.

ModernDayFreyja said...

The articles showed how the media is a double-edged sword. It can be used to help spread and enrich muslim traditions in a more modern and convenient way however it can also be exploited for a quick buck and the meaning may become lost on a commercialized piece of a holiday or significant event.